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Kratom Not A Best Product – Don’t Buy This Product, It Is Ineffective And Unsafe.

Dallas, TX , 08/07/2021 / Research Reviews /

Despite being praised for its ability to improve mood and reduce fatigue, some people are concerned about its safety and effectiveness.

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​​Kratom has been advertised in health news and vitamin shops as a mood booster, pain reliever, energy booster, and antidote to opioid withdrawal. The truth is that kratom is dangerous Mayo Report (1) and it has many safety concerns.

Kratom is derived from the leaves of an Evergreen Tree (Mitragyna speciosa) found in Southeast Asia. Kratom leaves are chewable and can be consumed or brewed. Kratom extract can be made into a liquid. Kratom extract in liquid form is often used to treat muscle pain, cramps, and diarrhea. Kratom can also be used for treating panic attacks.

According to some theories, kratom may affect opioid receptors. At low doses, Kratom acts as a stimulant and makes users more energetic. Taking higher doses may cause euphoria and reduce pain. It can be used to reduce anxiety and make users sleepy at high doses. Kratom is considered a substitute for opium by some practitioners of traditional Asian medicine.

People use kratom to avoid withdrawal symptoms and because it is more affordable than prescription drugs.

“FDA Seeks Public Input On Possible Global Kratom Ban After Domestic Scheduling Effort Stalled.”

As per www.marijuanamoment.net/

Music festivals and other recreational settings can also make use of kratom. Due to its plant-based nature, kratom is said to be safe and natural. A given dose of kratom can be difficult to determine because the percentage of active ingredients varies widely from plant to plant. A user’s health and the ingredients in the plant can make Kratom dangerous.

What is kratom?

DEA Kratom is a tropical tree (Mitragyna speciosa) native to Southeast Asia, with leaves that contain compounds that can have psychotropic (mind-altering) effects.

Kratom is not currently an illegal substance and has been easy to order on the internet. It is sometimes sold as a green powder in packets labeled “not for human consumption.” It is also sometimes sold as an extract or gum.

Source: drugabuse.gov

How does kratom affect the brain?

Kratom can cause effects similar to both opioids and stimulants. Two compounds in kratom leaves, mitragynine and 7-α-hydroxymitragynine, interact with opioid receptors in the brain, producing sedation, pleasure, and decreased pain, especially when users consume large amounts of the plant. Mitragynine also interacts with other receptor systems in the brain to produce stimulant effects. When kratom is taken in small amounts, users report increased energy, sociability, and alertness instead of sedation. However, kratom can also cause uncomfortable and sometimes dangerous side effects.

Source: drugabuse.gov

Safety concerns and side effects

While kratom users believe it is beneficial, researchers who have studied the herb believe that its side effects and safety concerns outweigh any benefits. Over 1,800 poison control centers in the United States received reports of kratom use between 2011 and 2017. Most patients suffered from seizures or high blood pressure. Kratom withdrawal was reported to have been experienced by five out of seven infants.

There are a few known side effects of Kratom, such as:

Research shows very little promise

Kratom was once considered an alternative to opioids and other prescription pain medications by some researchers. Researchers have found that there are many safety issues with Kratom and no clear benefits.

Prescription medicines can cause brain dysfunction when combined with Kratom. This can cause severe headaches, loss of communication, or confusion.

A study that tested kratom’s effectiveness as a treatment for opioid withdrawal showed that people who had taken kratom for over six months experienced withdrawal symptoms similar to those of those who have used opioids. People who have used kratom for more than six months may feel a craving and need treatment for opioid addiction such as buprenorphine and naloxone.

Kratom can also adversely affect the development of infants. The baby may experience withdrawal symptoms if kratom is consumed during pregnancy.

Salmonella bacteria can also be present in substances made from kratom. In April 2018, over 130 people were infected with Salmonella from kratom. Salmonella poisoning can be fatal and has been linked to more than 35 deaths by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. There are no symptoms of Salmonella contamination so it is best to avoid any products that could contain it.

Kratom is currently not regulated in the United States. Federal agencies are working to counter false claims about Kratom. Your best option is to consult your doctor to explore other options.

Should The Psychoactive Herb Kratom Be Banned Globally? The FDA Seeks Public Comments

The Federal Drug Administration is seeking public comments on kratom, a tropical plant native to Southeast Asia, which is currently not illegal and can have “opioid-like” effects.

Due to its legality, kratom can be easily purchased around the country as a dietary supplement often used as an energy booster, mood enhancer and pain reliever. In higher doses, kratom’s affinity with opioid receptors can produce sedation and pleasure.

Lack of conclusive research around the plant’s safety and efficacy has launched an all-out battle between kratom advocates and federal agencies working towards regulating or banning the plant.

Is Kratom Dangerous?

According to data from the National Poison Data System, between 2011 and 2017, eleven deaths were associated with kratom use mixed with other drugs, and only two deaths were associated with pure kratom use.

According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse (NIDA), “the FDA reports that many of the kratom-associated deaths appeared to have resulted from adulterated products or taking kratom with other potent substances, including illicit drugs, opioids, benzodiazepines, alcohol, gabapentin, and over-the-counter medications, such as cough syrup.” This evidence would suggest that regulating kratom products could work better than prohibition at alleviating kratom-related deaths.

While conclusive evidence has yet to be amassed, anecdotal reports account for the use of kratom as an herbal alternative to medical treatments in controlling withdrawal symptoms and cravings caused by opioid addiction.

According to the American Kratom Association, an advocacy group in favor of the herb’s use, “Kratom is a safe herbal supplement used by millions of Americans to manage pain, or as an alternative to coffee to help their mood and focus.” While kratom can have opioid-like effects by partially binding to opioid receptors, the herb “does not suppress the respiratory system which is the primary cause of overdoses,” says the association’s website.

A Move To Ban Kratom Internationally?

According to the American Kratom Association, the FDA has unfairly demonized kratom since 2009, spreading “inaccurate, distorted, and, in some cases, completely false information.” A 2018 animal study found that kratom “does not have abuse potential and reduces morphine intake” in rats. A follow-up NIDA-funded study suggested “a limited abuse liability,” marking kratom as a potential treatment to reduce opioid abuse.

While the plant remains legal, the American Kratom Association has established good manufacturing practices and labeling programs as efforts to independently regulate kratom products currently sold online and in brick-and-mortar stores.

Marijuana Moment reported that the FDA has issued a call for comments that can inform the country’s position in advance of an October meeting of the World Health Organization’s Expert Committee on Drug Dependence.

Comments can be submitted

until August 9, 2021. The call for comments also encompasses six other substances including synthetic opioids and synthetic cannabinoids.

While an expert committee from the WHO will consider whether information presented during the review period may justify the scheduling of some of these substances, kratom is still in a pre-review period, meaning that the international body is conducting preliminary analysis that should not determine whether the control status of the substance should be changed.

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Source: yahoo.com

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/consumer-health/in-depth/kratom/art-20402171

https://www.marijuanamoment.net/fda-seeks-public-input-on-possible-global-kratom-ban-after-domestic-scheduling-effort-stalled/

Source: Submit123News

Release ID: 25557

Original Source of the original story >> Kratom Not A Best Product – Don’t Buy This Product, It Is Ineffective And Unsafe.

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